Posts Tagged ‘Classroom Technology’

DIY Genius Bar

December 9, 2015

erinmagleysmallimageHave you ever thought of creating a help desk like those seen at computer stores?

We just held our first Genius Bar event at Denver Public School’s central office and I want to share the experience with you.

The Logistics

The idea of this event was suggested to me by a leader in our district.  I recruited “geniuses”  from our Ed Tech and IT departments as well as some other software experts that I knew in our building.  Using a Google doc I had folks signup and list their expertise.  I used this list to also generate table signs to go on the tables.  We’re fortunate to have a large open space on the top floor of our building, also known as the 14er.  There are long bar tables that I thought would be perfect for our purposes.

To promote the event I created very simple fliers that I posted throughout our building-in stairwells and on every bulletin board.  Here’s what the flier looked like:

geniusbarflierimageforblogpost

On the day of the event, the experts found their places at the bar and awaited people needing help  For people needing help they were greeted by two people on my team-Jessica and Taiya-who directed them to the appropriate expert.  If the expert was already busy then they put their name on a post it note next to the expert so everyone was aware of the queue.  Here are some images of our greeters and experts:

Reflecting on the Event

Enthusiasm was high among all participants and the “geniuses” did a lot of peer sharing when not helping folks.  I wish we had more folks dropping by in need of help.    We’ll try some different times and maybe different locations.  Everyone definitely wants this event to continue. We may not need as many “geniuses”.  This first time I had 13!  I’m also going to try some different communication channels.  The fliers by themselves may not be enough.  The trouble with email is that I have no way of just targeting people in the central office building and I don’t want other staff members and teachers who are at other locations to feel left out.  One last thought-we may have to create another name.  I have a feeling that “genius bar” is trademarked by Apple.  I welcome your suggestions!

Glossary for E-Learning, Distance Learning and Computer-Related Terms

August 20, 2015

books image for blogpostI’ve been in this field for so many years, and the world has turned largely digital, that I sometimes forget that not everyone speaks my instructional tech language.  To help others understand many of the terms that I and others in the field use I went searching for a comprehensive glossary that I could link for use.  Alas, my search was mostly fruitless as I couldn’t find one glossary that was both comprehensive and up-to-date.  So…as those of you who know my creative and determined persona, I decided to create one of my own.  To be comprehensive, I included many tertiary terms that are computer-related and even some instructional design terms for foundational knowledge.  To be accurate, I referred to multiple sources for cross-referencing and validity.  Finally I used my personal experience to make selections and massage the language where possible so that even people outside the field could comprehend the meanings.

The resulting glossary is here.  As a google doc you can search it and jump to alphabetical sections via the lettered table of contents.  Please share this resource freely.  If you are in the field of instructional technology, e-learning, distance education, then I welcome your comments and additions.  You can respond to this post or email me directly.

Photos for Class

March 2, 2015

6819094724I’m a big proponent for using Flickr Creative Commons as a source for finding reusable photos.  I’ve used many over the years and have made a concerted effort to give back by licensing virtually all of my photos with Creative Commons (CC) licensing.  The main hurdles for K-12 teachers who want to use Flickr CC is getting a safe filter and making it easy for them and their students to properly cite the photos they find.  Now there’s software to solve these problems:  Photosforclass.com

Besides providing a safe search for images, you’ll find that when you download an image it comes with full attribution at the bottom.  The image I used for this blog post is an example.  Let’s all find photos for class!

Innovate Conference at OSU

March 29, 2013

ImageThis post is my overview of the Innovate Conference held this past week at The Ohio State University (OSU) in Columbus Ohio.  The first keynote of the day was Jim Grooms from the University of Mary Washington.  I’ve been familiar with Jim’s work in the open digital storytelling course called DS106 (that you can sign up for here).   The DS106 concept is “everything you do online is a story”.  Jim fervently believes in totally open educational experiences and open platforms.  My favorite quote from him is “At its best, openness is an ethos not a license.  It’s an approach to teaching and learning that builds community online and offline.

One of the interesting presentations of the day was on iPads in the Classroom, although perhaps a more appropriate title would have been iPads In and Outside the Classroom.  This biology class divided the students into groups of 4 and gave each group an iPad to work on the day of class.  Using tools such as Apple Configurator, iTunesU, Notability and Box, the students are given an assignment to work through.  Some of the activities take place outdoors and involve documenting plants, the iPad is perfectly suited for this and by limiting the software that is installed on the iPad the students stay focused on the assignment.

One panel of the day that was surprising in its appearance and candor was one featuring three undergraduate students relating their “user experience” with technology in the classroom and online activities.   They stressed a desire to follow their grades online and for faculty to post course materials online.  They were undecided the use of discussion boards but did like the idea of posting short lecture materials online and leaving more time in the classroom for interaction with the teacher and course activities.

I could go on and on about the ideas shared at the conference and its incredible value.  Did you know this annual conference is free to attend?  I invite you to look at this year’s recordings here and mark your calendars for next year when the conference will be on March 25 and 26, 2014.  Kudos to all the folks at OSU who I know must put a lot of work into this magnificent event for everyone interested in technology and teaching.

iChat in the Classroom

November 2, 2010

Earlier this semester I helped Mikita Brottman, who is currently teaching a course titled “ZooOntologies” at MICA, with a live videoconference for her course.  Since we didn’t have a fully-capable videoconference room available to us, we adapted and used iChat to connect with Dr. David Priestman at Oxford University.  For an engaging 45 minutes the students were able to ask Dr. Priestman questions related to the ethical use of animals for research purposes.  Because of the desktop limitations, students took turns, seated in front of the classroom iMac, to pose their questions.  With the aid of the projector and its speaker, everyone in class was able to see and hear Dr. Priestman.  The subsequent feedback from all the participants was very positive.  This seems to show that desktop videoconferencing can work in a classroom situation with some adaptation.  In the near future we hope to have a more formally-equipped videoconference room at MICA-watch for news on this blog.

As further documentation of the event, see the photos posted below: