Posts Tagged ‘Instructional Technology’

Top 5 Takeaways from CBOL 2017

May 12, 2017

CBOL 2017 logoAfter attending any conference I try to share my top takeaways.  Here are my top five from the Conference on Blended and Online Learning (CBOL)  held this year in Colorado.

1.  Personalized Learning in Jefferson County:  Students have control over the pace and path of their learning in the Virtual Academy.  Despite it’s name implying a 100% online experience, there are face-to-face days with tutoring, guidance and enrichment.  This makes me think that the metastudy done years ago by the Department of Education is still valid-Blended (hybrid) course delivery is the best of both worlds.

2.  DIY Personalized PD discoveries: The smartest person in the room is the room (crowdsourcing, leveraging everyone as experts).   The best PD is developed by teachers for teachers.  Take a look at their presentation here.   During this hands-on, group-sourced session, we came up with these ideas.  Besides this being an engaging session and producing group notes and artifacts, I loved the fact that they walked the talk.  I don’t know why more PD sessions don’t leverage google docs for collaborative notes.

 
3.  From that session, I proposed this metaphor to describe personalized learning:  Drinking from a water fountain as opposed to a firehose:  water fountain personalized learning metaphorI think the metaphor works pretty well.

4.  Becky Nusbaum gave a captivating, interactive presentation where she both showed how Twitter could be used to cultivate PLN (Personal Learning Network)s for teachers, while at the same time we tweeted to each other and added ideas to the session.  I thought that this was a good way to have participants dive right in to the tool being discussed.  Two good resources she shared were  Twitter for Teachers, Chatting and Best Practices  and the Directory of Ed Chats.  It’s on my to-do list to develop a workshop for teachers on developing PLNs.

5.  The keynote speaker, Tom Vander Ark, shared his 18 tips for student-centered learning.  Tom talked about many of these tips as “must do’s” such as: Every student should work on publicly publishing something (as a team) HS level.  Every student should have work-based learning…work-study at Christo Rey for an example.  “High school kids can change the world right here right now.  Let’s give them the skills to live and succeed in this complex world.”   These are powerful ideas and his enthusiasm for them is contagious.   Here is a link to his presentation.  I highly recommend looking at his list.

It’s All Happening at the Library…

May 5, 2017

c811bd04107310c47788d5b937d7cc32Once upon a time, libraries contained books, microfiche, and maybe some film and LP records.  Today, libraries like the Denver Public Library are chock full of computers, but they also have some brand new 21st century resources we can all use.

Recently I visited the central branch of the Denver Public Library.  Of particular interest, to me, is their new digital media labs.  In one space, pictured below, is equipment to digitize analog music and video material.IMG_0026 In the next room is an audio recording facility.  IMG_0020These rooms can be reserved with a library card! For free! Also on this floor is another media lab with 3D printers and another audio recording booth.  If you’re a Denver resident and interested in learning more about these facilities and perhaps booking a room and/or a tutorial, you can find more info here at their website.  The room is called the Idea Lab.  I highly recommend you visit your local library and find out what new media resources may be available to you, for free.

Glossary for E-Learning, Distance Learning and Computer-Related Terms

August 20, 2015

books image for blogpostI’ve been in this field for so many years, and the world has turned largely digital, that I sometimes forget that not everyone speaks my instructional tech language.  To help others understand many of the terms that I and others in the field use I went searching for a comprehensive glossary that I could link for use.  Alas, my search was mostly fruitless as I couldn’t find one glossary that was both comprehensive and up-to-date.  So…as those of you who know my creative and determined persona, I decided to create one of my own.  To be comprehensive, I included many tertiary terms that are computer-related and even some instructional design terms for foundational knowledge.  To be accurate, I referred to multiple sources for cross-referencing and validity.  Finally I used my personal experience to make selections and massage the language where possible so that even people outside the field could comprehend the meanings.

The resulting glossary is here.  As a google doc you can search it and jump to alphabetical sections via the lettered table of contents.  Please share this resource freely.  If you are in the field of instructional technology, e-learning, distance education, then I welcome your comments and additions.  You can respond to this post or email me directly.